<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1678611822423757&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Defrag This

| Read. Reflect. Reboot.

How IT Pros Can Navigate Through a Job Interview

Rick Robinson| January 29 2016

| security, IT insights

 

how it pros can navigate through a job interview What can you do to make the IT job interview go well?

 

You've landed an IT job interview. That's the good news. Now you have the interview itself, and let's be honest, it's never fun. Most candidates don't like putting on a show of the software and protocols they're familiar with. Even actors aren't in love with auditioning. The "social" aspect of recruitment isn't something you should need to ace for an admin position, but it has to be done.

If the job is a really good one — the technical work that'll challenge your current support acumen (and compensate you well for the weekend maintenance) — you probably have a bit of an imposter complex even just applying. When the "ideal candidate" is an infosec wizard, how dare you present yourself? But hey, you believe you can do it, and the pay is great. So read that magazine and wait to be met.

Find Strengths in Technical Weaknesses

What can you do to make the IT job interview go well? Some things should be no-brainers, but there's a reason think pieces keep pounding them into your head (present article excluded). Don't be "creepy" with company research, advises InformationWeek, and don't dress for the beach unless an offbeat SMB suggests otherwise. Do pay attention to the job description, though (don't ask questions it already answered), and learn enough about the employer to imply a healthy interest.

Ultimately, play to your strengths. Lawyers have a saying: If the facts are against you, argue the law; if the law is against you, argue the facts. If you don't have hands-on experience in data center migration, stress your credentials in bandwidth control during this process. Show that you know what's involved in secure file transfers even if you haven't managed them offsite. If your formal credentials are thin, play up your experience in the network trenches during the Super Bowl traffic spike.

Be Mindful of the Interviewers Who Don't Work in IT

With luck, your interview with an IT rep will find some common ground. There may be scripts you're both comfortable reading or security issues you should both be following. This will give you the chance to talk like a human as well as what the job will involve. One of the bigger challenges of an IT job interview, however, is that you may also meet someone from the business side. This guy knows only vaguely what network monitoring tools are and is probably a bit intimidated by the idea of bandwidth or network latency. In other words, they probably feel like the imposter, interviewing someone for a seat in ops they don't fully understand.

But one thing you definitely don't want to do is remind the interviewer of their own uncertainties. Talk confidently about the work, without going so deep into the technical weeds that the interviewer isn't sure what you're saying. Although this shorthand may demonstrate fluency in a multi-vendor environment, it can also suggest you can't communicate well with the other departments.

You're a Social Animal

For better or worse, a job interview is a social interaction. Some sysadmins and IT pros would gladly trade the spotlight for wrestling with a wonky script or normalizing office bandwidth.

Nonetheless, this can produce a disconnect. As one IT candidate reported by Dice.com said when asked to describe the ideal work environment, "I just want a job where I can go in a room, do my work and be left alone."

That candidate probably speaks for many admins, developers, and other overworked helpdesks, but he didn't get the job. Business people (including those who work for nonprofits and government) tend to celebrate charisma, and for good reason: The job is all about meeting client needs, which means talking to the customer to understand what they really want.

The good news? Your competition is other techies, probably just as geeky at heart.

The bottom line is that if you're comfortable about your qualifications for the job — even if it is pushing your limits — that confidence will show through, and help you navigate the rocky spots. And who knows, you may be just who they're looking for.

Topics: security, IT insights

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

THIS POST WAS WRITTEN BY Rick Robinson

Free Trials

Getting started has never been easier. Download a trial today.

Download Free Trials

Contact Us

Let us know how we can help you. Focus on what matters. 

Send us a note

Subscribe to our Blog

Let’s stay in touch! Register to receive our blog updates.