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How to Handle ISO Certification

Jacqueline Lee| January 14 2016

| security, IT insights

handle iso certificationThe International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is a non-governmental entity of 162 standardizing bodies from multiple industries. By creating sets of standards across different markets, it promotes quality, operational efficiency and customer satisfaction.

Businesses seek ISO certification to signal their commitment to excellence. As a midsized IT service team implementing ISO standards, you can reshape quality management, operations and even company culture.

Choosing the Right Certification

The first step is to decide which sets of standards apply to your area of specialization. Most sysadmins focus on three sets of standards: 20000, 22301 and 27001.

  • ISO 20000 helps organizations develop service-management standards. It standardizes how the helpdesk provides technical support to customers as well as how it assesses its service delivery.
  • ISO 22301 consists of business continuity standards designed to address how you'd handle significant external disruptions, like natural disasters or acts of terrorism. These standards are especially relevant for hospital databases, emergency services, transportation and financial institutions — anywhere big service interruptions could spell a catastrophe.
  • ISO 27001 standardizes infosec management within the organization both to reduce the likelihood of costly data breaches and to protect customers and intellectual property. In support of ISO 27001, ISO 27005 offers concrete guidelines for security risk management.

Decisions, Decisions

Deciding which ISO compliance challenge to tackle first depends on a few different things. If your helpdesk is already working within a framework like ITIL — with a customer-oriented, documented menu of services — ISO 20000 certification will be an easy win that can motivate the team to then tackle a bigger challenge, like security. If you're particularly concerned about security and want to start there, try combining ISO 22301 and ISO 27001 under a risk-management umbrella. Set up a single risk assessment/risk treatment framework to address both standards at once.

Getting Started

ISO compliance is not about checking off boxes indicating you've reached a minimum standard. It's about developing effective processes to improve performance. With ISO 22301 and 27001, you'll document existing risks, evaluate them and decide whether to accept or reduce them. With ISO 20000, you'll document current service offerings and helpdesk procedures like ticket management and identify ways to reduce time to resolution.

Prioritizing

ISO compliance looks a little different to every organization, and IT finds its own balance between risk prevention and acceptance. For instance, if a given risk is low and fixing it would be inexpensive, accept the risk, document it and don't throw money at preventing it. Whichever standard you start with, though, keep a few principles in mind:

  • Focus on your most critical business processes. Identify what your organization can least afford to lose — financial transactions processing, for example. On subsequent assessments, you can dig deeper into less crucial operations.
  • Identify which vulnerabilities endanger those processes. Without an effective ticketing hierarchy at the helpdesk, a sysadmin could wind up troubleshooting an employee's flickering monitor while an entire building loses network connectivity.
  • Avoid assessing every process or asset at first. Instead of looking at all in-house IP addresses for ISO 27001, focus on the equipment supporting your most important functions. Again, you can dig deeper after standardizing the way you manage information.
  • Don't chase irrelevant items. Lars Neupart, founder and CEO of Neupart Information Security Management, finds that ISO 27005 threat catalogs look like someone copied them from a whiteboard without bothering to organize them. Therefore, don't assume every listed item applies to every situation. As Neupart puts it; "Not everything burns."
  • Put findings in terms that management can understand. When you're asking management to pay for implementing new helpdesk services or security solutions, keep your business assessments non-technical. Put information in numerical terms, such as estimating the hourly cost of downtime or the percent of decline in quarterly revenue after a data breach.

So, How Much Is This Going to Cost?

Bonnie del Conte is president of CONNSTEP, Inc., a Connecticut-based company that assists companies in implementing ISO across a range of industries. She says the biggest expenses related to ISO certification are payroll, the creation of assessment documentation and systems (e.g., documentation for periodic assessments, including both paper and software) and new-employee training programs. Firms like hers stipulate consulting fees in addition to the actual certification audit. At the same time, hiring a consultant can reduce the time intervals for standards implementation and audit completion — and prevent mistakes.

Why It's Worth It

The ultimate goal of ISO certification is to generate measurable value and improvement within IT. It's about how proactive, progressive awareness and problem-solving prevents disasters, improves service and makes operations more efficient. Its greatest intangible benefit, says del Conte, is often a better relationship between IT and management. "Companies find improved communication from management," del Conte says, "due to more transparency about expectations and the role that everyone has in satisfying customer expectations."

Don't try to become the perfect IT service team or address every security vulnerability the first time around. Hit the most important points and then progressively look deeper with every assessment cycle. As your operations improve, so will IT's culture and its relationship with the business side. If ISO certification helps you prove that IT is way more than a cost center, it's worth the investment.

Topics: security, IT insights

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THIS POST WAS WRITTEN BY Jacqueline Lee

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